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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 456 (some duplicates have been removed)
: ...an extraordinary expansion of manhunt missions that have taken out thousands of al qaeda and taliban fighters. >> if you're trying to take down an insurgency, you take away its safe havens, you take away its leaders. >> hit the guy on the road. >> the joint special operations command is almost an industrial- scale counterterrorism killing machine. >> narrator: frontline investigates the latest us strategy... >> bludgeon your opponent. kill and capture as many as you can. make them ask for peace. >> narrator: ...its impact and its risks. >> by launching those attacks, are we creating more militants than in fact we are killing? >> narrator: can this campaign of killing and capturing make the difference? >> it could take years. i mean, i don't think anybody knows. >> bin laden's gone. that creates the kind of space in which diplomacy might actually be able to make progress. >> narrator: tonight on frontline , "kill/capture." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding i
weapons -- the hopeful plea of the british prime minister to the taliban. is there any chance they will listen? a long march across africa for these somali refugees. they are driven to desperation. >> we have to scale up operations to meet the growing need. >> constantly connected -- is social media leaving all of us overwhelmed? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. stop fighting, stop bombing, join the political process -- that is what british prime minister david cameron asked a taliban today. even as he spoke those words, four nato soldiers were killed in the eastern part of the country, which begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? the bbc reports. >> british troops in the helmand -- in helmand, dropping into an area the taliban previously controlled. the taliban wisely weren't there to meet them. so far, the british soldiers have not met any opposition. usually, the insurgency retreats, but not always. the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. the taliban steal our food, he says. i am very po
the process will end. sometime in 2014. >> only recently, taliban fighters launched an attack on the prestigious inter- continental hotel in kabul. responsibility for security in the capital had already been transferred to afghans, but neither police nor the army was able to defeat the attackers. helicopters called in to help end the siege after five hours. since the incident, the hotel has become a symbol of evidence in the face of terrorism and is the worst moment for the beginning troop withdrawal from afghanistan. >> the u.s. military and its allies started bombing afghanistan within weeks of the 911 attacks and brought down the taliban regime with air strikes and a massive ground assault within months. the international security assistance force was set up to stabilize the country after the fall of the taliban. we now take a look back at the afghan mission in the past decade. >> their mission was to draw out the taliban and deny al qaeda the most important base. planned to last just a few weeks, the war in afghanistan still goes on a decade later. president george bush ga
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the taliban continued to attack nato forces, but one u.s. senator tells us american troops must leave the country even sooner. a long march across africa for these somali refugees. the threat of drought and civil war has driven them to desperation. >> we can scale up our operation to meet the growing need. this crisis could turn into a catastrophe. >> and a royal welcome in one of canada's most remote regions. the duke and duchess of cambridge get a taste of the great outdoors. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and to our viewers across the globe. stop bombing, stop fighting, and joined the political process. that is what the british prime minister, david cameron, asked the taliban today. but even as he spoke those words on the second day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
with the taliban. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination which has opened up a power vacuum. >> he describes himself as the most powerful men in southern afghanistan. few disagreed. ahmad wali karzai was a controversial figure. in kandahar today, the walls of sight of his compound were closed. the president's half brother lived under the tightest security. only the closest could get close. without saying a word, he shot him twice. he welcomed president sarkozy of france. he said, this morning, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred. this is the life of afghan people. we have all suffered the same kind of pain. forgive me for not speaking with a smile today. ahmad wali karzai was said to be deeply involved with the heroin trade. the allegations strained relations with afghanistan's allies. in april, he told a bbc documentary crew about attempts on his life. >> are there still now? >> every day. >> drug traffickers? >> taliban. >> ahmad wali karzai came close to being charged with corruption. according to a u.s. official, he was too valuable. here in kabul, the have lost
about afghanistan and about women's experience in the days of the taliban, and of course under u.s. policy of our engagement there. and it's a chance to really understand how our policy is playing out through the eyes of this one story, the dressmaker, khair kahn and we would like to get your calls for this is the process of making this interactive see you all for your comment by phone order. let me give you the telephone numbers. he strolled the and -- eastern and central time zone is 202-585-3885. if you live in a mountain or how many times did you travel to afghanistan? >> guest: seven times since 2005. i spent about one third of 2008 and one-third of 2009 and a big chunk of 2009 and last year i was there for the july for the kabul conference and i was there in december about seven months pregnant working on maternal health stories. >> host: that wasn't a great way to engage with the women because of common experience. now your career as a political television producer for abc. how did you make the transition from that to writing this book? >> guest: very carefully. [laughter]
in dealing with the taliban. yet the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination, which has opened a power vacuum in the country. this is our report. >> ahmad wali karzai live behind layers of security. he had many enemies. today, his enemy was his end. assassins struck here at his home. a trusted assassin, a bodyguard. another bodyguard shot of a killer dead. it was too late, ahmad wali karzai died almost immediately and the news traveled fast. in kabul, president karzai announced his death. >> this morning, he said, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred in his house. this is the life of the afghan people. we have all suffered from the same pain. ahmad wali karzai was the most powerful player in kandahar. when we recently visited his compound, it was probably a day like today. he was the man to solve every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came u
of security. killed by 2 gunshot wounds earlier this morning. the taliban has said that they carried out the attack. they have been successful and kandahar at assassinating leaders in the past year. the talibsaan say this is one of their biggest achievements in 10 years of war. i was speaking to a u.s. official who said she was a controversial official. they knew about the allegations of drug dealing. as a result of his death, there are worries about what might happen in kandahar. >> does it change karzai's position of strength? >> he was a key figure in the fight against the taliban. not just for the afghan government. he was in kabul a few weeks ago trying to negotiate the next governor of the province. was not that long ago the american ambassador met with ahmad wali karzai. ahmad wali karzai he was realist, a tough man, a man whose tentacles spread far and wide. she was aware of the threat to him. >> the taliban issued letters to most of the top leaders. if you don't leave kandahar in 5 days, you face death. >> what we have seen from the taliban is a change in tactics. those big atta
to time. i do think we now have a context to empathize with other victims. >> with terrorism -- taliban, al-qaeda -- they are synonymous in our minds? >> al qaeda it is terror group number one, but it is broader than that. there are terrorists all over the world. most people believe that terrorist -- there will be more terrorist groups in the future. >> that is kind of frightening. we never knew suicide bombers and things like that. now, all of a sudden, they will show up in countries all over the world, throw bombs, ied's. >> this form of terrorism was started in tamil. >> what is the form? >> suicide bombers, both male and female. was president bush -- >> was president bush on tiger when he used the phrase "war and terror -- "war on terror"? i think -- >> i think he was. it also needs to be understood that this is not a war on instruments. a can not always be fought by military means -- it cannot always be fought by military means, though that can be effective. there are a lot of different tactics to adopt in this war. it will go on for decades. >> in addition to creating fear, do the
we are talking of i.s.i. abetting or being complicit with al qaeda and taliban who have killed 4,000 of our soldiers. who has killed 4,000 army men of pakistan? who has killed about 300 i.s.i. people? who has done that? some canadians? (laughter). >> jon: can i say this? can i say this? canadians are a ruthless people. (cheers and applause) i would not put it past them. all right, we're going to take a commercial break. when we come back, more from pervez (cheers and applause). >> jon: we're back with pervez musharraf. sir, now, our country right now, we need each other, clearly we need each other in this region, especially since we have a plan. and i really hope that this... obviously i'm not a general, i'm not involved in high-level intelligence. (laughter) but we may be leaving afghanistan within the next 50 or 60 years. (laughter) and if that occurs, what is pakistan's interest in the taliban in that, you know, what is the situation that, as you see it with our maybe pulling back a little bit? >> that's a serious issue to be considered, especially to... it will have implicati
was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
, aiming for taliban dug into the hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go. go. go! >> they range cover from heavy machine guns. >> but the bullets are too close. >> that was the scene in an isolated american military outpost in afghanistan's kunar province. troops were assaulted by taliban insurgents hiding in the hills above. our reporter was there and covered the fire. tonight he joins us from another combat outpost in kunar province. so, nick, the obvious question is what is it look? you were there with the servicemen in that outpost. what is it like to come under siege like this day in, day out in afghanistan? >> reporter: well, i think there is a very large barrier. for me, it is sedentary, for the troops themselves, it's a fairly harrowing ordeal to have this constant potential threat of large attack. in the back of their minds, there is always the possibility that it could get overrun. there have been two serious ininstances in which outposts like that surrounded by taliban and they've been attacked and overwhelmed. they do have overwhelming firepower. and t
troops. i think we can all agree, at least i hope we can, that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it's one part terrorist organization, one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past two years virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, united stat s special forces and afghan police had ties to the taliban.ice what our forces find when they raid drug labs is not only large quantities of opium and heroin,d but heroin, but also also im explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in just one raid last year, 2,056 pounds of the highest grade heroin with wholesale value of $6 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. therefore, as the united states military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we've got to ensure our civilians continue to support counter narcotics efforts in afghanistan. i think that's really important. a year ago this month this caucus released a bipartisan report entitled united states counter narcotics strategy in afghanistan, which
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: with little more than a week until the debt ceiling deadline, lawmakers on both sides of capitol hill offered competing plans today on how to avert a crisis. and late today,
. >> al qaeda is under more pressure than at any time since 9/11. >> reporter: still this deadly taliban raid on a hotel in kabul last week shows insurgents aren't willing to go quietly. >> if we don't succeed here and the taliban comes back into power we'll be attacked again. >> reporter: while the debate continues, american troops are carrying on with their mission preparing to hand over security back to the afghan people, the drawdown is set to begin this month. terrell, some initial diplomatic moves have been made to jumpstart peace talks with the taliban but on his trip senator mccain saw no signs whatsoever the taliban is ready to talk peace. >> joel brown in washington for thus morning, thank you so much. >>> overseas, thailand elected its first ever female prime minister by a landslide, comes from a political family, her brother was once prime minister but ousted by a military coup in 2006. the country will go along with the election results. >>> peace activists plan to sail from greece today even though the greek government banned their ships from going to gaza. protests yesterd
says it implicates hezbollah. >> a french hostage released by the taliban tells the bbc he believes the deal was done to secure his freedom. and canada welcomes william and kate on their first official trip abroad. it's 2:00 a.m. here in london. >> it is 9:00 a.m. here in singapore. broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america and around the world. this is newsday. >> the chinese communist party is celebrating its 90th anniversary. the world's largest political party with a membership of more than 18 million. and it's managed to stay in power elsewhere have been pushed aside. our correspondent, michael bristow, traveled to the city of yen-on in northern china. the communist base during the civil war more than 60 years ago and considered by many as a birthplace of china's communist revolution. >> the communists like to celebrate their victory. they do it twice a day. there's courage in sacrifice but most of it on one side. they see a partial version of history with a clear message. mao tse-tung's party saved the country. this propaganda is fed to the young, they love the party even befo
released by the taliban told the bbc he believes the deal was done to secure his freedom. canada welcomes william and kate on their first official trip abroad. it is 11:00 a.m. here in singapore. >> we're broadcasting to viewers on pbs america and around the world. >> venezuelan president hugo job as within the last few hours held -- hugo chavez with in the last few hours held a press conference. he is recovering from surgery. the president acknowledged he had a tumor and had undergone surgery to remove a cancerous cells. he says he is determined to fight and is on the road to recovery. sara joins me now. after watching the footage over the last few days, this comes as a bit of a surprise. >> it does. it is quite a big admission because the government has tried to manage this illness. the president has let information out here and there, but no great disclosure. this speech by the president somewhat unexpected and very serious. it was very obvious from watching it that he has had some serious health problems. he lost a lot of weight. his voice is much weaker than we are used to hearing. v
host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence suggests we have halted the taliban insurgency in the heartland of helmand province. mr. speaker, we are now entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces more training and mentoring. as president obama said in his address last month, the mission is changing from combat to support. when we arrived, there was no one to hand over to, no proper army, no police force. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. mr. speaker, success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure that the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. now, i know there have been well-known problems, especially, with the afghan po
the trigger. today, details on the deadly betrayal that could benefit the taliban. in box two, two planes collide. the two planes land. and everybody lives to talk about it. the extremely unusual survival story is ahead. and in box three, a man falls nearly from the stand here at this field during the home run derby. at least his friends have good hands. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. in "studio b" but, first, from fox at high noon, chase field in phoenix, arizona, in five hours the best players in all of baseball step on to the field and catch the big game. on the local fox station, after the fox report, tonight, on this channel, and before then we will talk about major league baseball and the predictions and highlights from the home run derby. what do you know, robbie put on a clinic with help from his old man, and that is coming up in a few minutes in "studio b" today. but, first from fox at 12:00 in phoenix and 3:00 on the east coast the investigators of the casey anthony murder trial speaking of the case and for the first te since last week's not guilty verdic
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
blood. he was also shot and killed by other security guards. the taliban have claimed responsibility saying they had been working with the killer for, quote, some time." awk was an infamous power broker in kandahar province, a key province and the spiritual home of the taliban and considered to be a part of the drug trade but u.s. and nato officials say they needed him, a stabilizing figure in an otherwise unstable region. his death leaves behind a power vacuum and is considered a big victory for the taliban, ann? >> thank you so much. >>> another milestone up in space today as two residents of the international space station stepped outside to retrieve a broken ammonia pump so it could be returned to earth for examination. it was the final space walk of the american shuttle era. meantime, the landing plan for the atlantis has changed and it's now scheduled to touch down before dawn on july 21st at the kennedy space center. >>> poignant moments in palm desert, california, where representatives of the current and previous first families attended a memorial service for betty ford, who
, distant relatives. the taliban claimed responsibility saying they've worked with sadar mohammed for some time now. but many believe it could be because of a tribal feud which confuses everyone when it comes to afghanistan, because we have to remember there's more than just the taliban at play here. >> and mr. karzai's body was later hung over the streets in kandahar. can you put into perspective for viewers in the united states what his death means in that country? >> reporter: absolutely. when you look at awk, everyone has heard about his narco trading, possibly being involved in the narcotics trading, possibly being involved in the backhand tradings. but the u.s. and nato officials i've spoken to for the last few years here said they needed awk. he was a stabilizing factor in kandahar and that his death mrooefs leaves behind a strong power vacuum that many people are afraid of what exactly will fill that vacuum. a lot of people think it's going to be an even more dangerous power broker or the taliban. >> all right. thanks so much. we appreciate it. as always, we'll talk to you again so
karzai, has been shot dead. with a controversial figure. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack. a few months ago, he was interviewed. >> it is quite extraordinary. we were in kandahar for a film in april, and i noted how many layers of security, barb wire, barriers, concrete walls that he had around his compaq and -- of around his compound. i told him he must be in the most heavily secured building in kandahar, and he said, "i have been attacked many times." i said, "who else has attacked khieu?" he said, "is just the taliban." he was regarded in kandahar as the man who had the most power in the province, the man who was the main power broker, whether it came to problems like taking on the taliban, getting help with one of your ailing relatives. >> in about half an hour, we will have more information. clinton, what is the reaction to this killing? >> well, from western diplomats, a great sense of loss. they knew that ahmad wali karzai -- he was the man who could deliver the promised to bring that promise closer to them. not just in the sense of dealing with u.s.
there are threats. >> the taliban? >> the taliban. >> despite always protesting his innocence, ahmed wali karzai came close to being charged with corruption but according to a u.s. official, he was too valuable. we needed him. he kept a lid on things and can hard. they say they have lost a strong man in the fight against the taliban in the south. the fight just became harder. >> in other news, the u.n. security council has condemned the attacks against the french embassies in the syrian capital of damascus. staff were injured and property damage when government supporters stormed the embassy on monday. speaking on u.s. television, president obama criticized the president for a missing opportunities for reform and warned against anybody "messing with the american embassy." thousands of people have held protests in cairo demanding the removal of egypt's ruling military council. the act of this wants faster political reform. the military has said the elections could be delayed. you're watching live. still to come, one of the lucky ones. the struggle of migrants fleeing the arab uprising to reach ma
in a helicopter crash after a firefight with taliban drug traffickers that also claimed the lives of seven serviceman. on october29th, 2009, the remains of dea special agents forest lehman, chad michael, michael westin, and the fallen united states service members were met by president obama at dover air force base. he honored the men and paid his respects at the dignified transfer ceremony. co-chairman grassley and i wish to convene our deepest condolences to the families of these dea agents that gave their lives fighting narcotics trafficking in afghanistan and hereby enter their obituaries into the record for today's hearing. its hard i think for both of us to realize that we have people who carry out these missions and get killed carrying out these missions, and they do our country great service, and not much is said about it. but this committee wants everyone to know that we very much appreciate that service and we certainly honor it in the best way we can. so i would now like to turn to my co-chairman, senator grassley, for his opening statement. >> thank you for honoring the memory
accusations. taliban has claimed responsibility for the assassination. officials have raised concern that it will lead to new fights who controls afghanistan's southern province. >>> board of supervisors will vote today on a proposal to ask 12 other california bodies if they want to break away from california and form their own state. it calls for creating south california stretching from san diego and orange county into the south to mariposa county and riverside county supervisor jeff stone believes california has become too big to govern. a spokesman for the governor says it's a waste of everybody's time. >> peace and quiet, popular hotel chain unveils the first anti-snoring room. >> and first and last shuttle spacewalk is happening right now. >> and firefighters in one bay area station didn't have to go very far to respond to an overnight crash. what police say led to a crash right outside the firefighters' front door. >>> you're looking live picture from nasa tv. its spacewalk, the final spacewalk of the space shuttle era. two astronauts and nasa tweeted four
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 456 (some duplicates have been removed)